Glossary


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76) RMA

Rack Manufacturers Institute, Inc. The Rack Manufacturers Institute, Inc. is an independent incorporated trade association affiliated with the Material Handling Industry.  The membership of RMI is made up of companies which produce the preponderance of industrial storage racks. Rack Manufacturers Institute 8720 Red Oak Blvd., Suite 201 Charlotte, NC  28217 Phone: (704) 676-1190    Fax:  (704) 676-1199 Jeff Woroniecki, Managing Director

77) Shelving

A storage system designed to accept and store non-palletized loads, placed thereon, either manually, semi-automatically or automatically such as by an automated retrieval mechanism. In its basic open form, shelving is comprised of upright posts, the desired number of formed steel sheet panels which constitute horizontal shelves, and end and back braces. Sheet steel back and side panels may be substituted for bracing to form enclosed shelving units.

78) Material Handling

Material Handling is the movement, storage, control and protection of materials, goods and products throughout the process of manufacturing, distribution, consumption and disposal.  The focus is on the methods, mechanical equipment, systems and related controls used to achieve these functions. See also, Supply Chain, Supply Chain Management, Logistics and Third Party Logistics. Note that all of referenced terms are highly interrelated and their definitions are frequently intermingled.

79) Rotary rack

A rotary rack is a special variation of a horizontal carousel. In this case each vertical level or storage location is mechanically independent of the location above or beneath it. Each level in turn is driven by a separate and independent drive. Therefore, simultaneous, independent rotation of each level is possible (in any direction). Although replenishment and picking can be accomplished manually, most rotary racks incorporate automatic load inserters and extractors. See also Horizontal Carousels and/or AS/RS .

80) Unit Load AGV

A unit load AGV is a powered, wheel based transport vehicle that carries a discrete load, such as an individual item (e.g. a large roll of paper, coil of steel or automobile engine) or items contained on a pallet or in a tote or similar temporary storage medium. AGVs operate under computer control without the need for human operators or drivers. See also AGVS .

81) Stacker crane

The stacker crane in appearance looks like a conventional bridge crane except that in place of a hoist, a rotating ridged or telescoping mast is suspended from the bridge trolley with the mast equipped with a load handling device such as single or double forks or a grab. These cranes can be manually operated or powered and are used where the carne spans multiple aisles allowing for the storage and retrieval within any aisle of items such as coils of steel.

82) Pallet stacking frame

A load securing device that often can take the place of containers or bins. This device consists on iron posts and connecting frame members resting on the four corners of a pallet creating an open container in appearance with a certain amount of load retention ability. The frames are removable for storage, but when in use, the loaded pallets can be block stacked on the floor. This is a particular advantage for unit loads that would not stack safely without the rigid frame. There are other attachments such as special metal frames and welded wire gates, but none of these allow for pallet stacking.

83) Honeycombing

1. The practice of removing merchandise in pallet load quantities where the space is not exhausted in an orderly fashion. This results in inefficiencies due to the fact that the received merchandise may not be efficiently stored in the space which is created by the honey-combing. 2. The storing or withdrawal or supplies in a manner that results in vacant space that is not usable for storage of other items. 3.  Creation of unoccupied space resulting from withdrawal of unit loads.  This is one of the major hidden costs of warehousing.

84) Side loader truck

An industrial truck with lifting capabilities and able to accommodate the narrowest of aisles, depending upon the model and type, all the way down to the 5 foot range. Trucks operating in this range are sometimes called very narrow aisle (VNA) trucks. With the exception of the platform type sideloader, the fork and/or the entire mast on a VNA style truck is capable of rotating or swiveling 90 degrees left or right within the aisle from the down aisle orientation. Some manufacturers have models that can stack in storage racks 10-12 pallets high.

85) R- Mark

In 1998, the members of the Rack Manufacturers Institute (RMI) voluntarily chose to cause conformance to RMI 97 and any successor documents(s) to be a condition of membership in the Association. In 1999, the members of RMI agreed to a certification process administered through a panel of independent Registered Professional Engineers.  Certification requires the submitter to demonstrate a working knowledge of RMI 97 including delivering evidence of various physical tests needed to compute frame and beam load tables. Upon satisfactory completion of the Certification Process, the submitter is awarded a license to apply a unique registered R-Mark to designs.  The R-Mark is only applied by a Licensed Professional Engineer along side of his/her PE seal. The process is open to all rack manufacturers.  RMI encourages specifiers and users of Industrial Steel Storage Rack to consider the value of R-Mark certification when applying racking solutions.

86) Integrated Systems & Controls

Integrated Systems and Controls (ISC) refers to a product section of the Material Handling Industry of America. An integrated system is a desired state that generally refers to at least one of the three possible characteristics of an installed material handling system. First, although mechanical automation of the material flow properties of a system may be evident, it is the automation of the information flow associated with what is taking place, concurrently with the physical flow, that is the most defining characteristic. Secondly, an integrated system can be characterized by an unbroken, highly coordinated material flow link between successive stages in a manufacturing or warehousing operation where continuous flow is emphasized, and delays, waiting and intermediate storage minimized. Thirdly, an integrated system characteristically interfaces two or more material handling devices in order to form the bridge between work stations or other discrete points of origin and destination within the material flow cycle, with the goal being a high degree of mechanical coordination and the precise timing of movements. See also System Integrator , Consultant , and Controls .